Our Perspective

      • Scaling-up matters for South-South Cooperation | Grace Wang

        06 Nov 2013

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        A WOMAN EMPLOYED UNDER THE MAHATMA GANDHI NATIONAL RURAL EMPLOYMENT GUARANTEE SCHEME IN INDIA ACCESSES INFORMATION RELATING TO HER EMPLOYMENT AT AN INFORMATION KIOSK. (PHOTO: UNDP INDIA)

        The global development cooperation landscape is changing rapidly. Emerging economies and other developing countries have become key actors in the new development architecture. They offer practical solutions, share rich knowledge and take leadership and collective actions. For example, the Brazilian bolsa familia programme, a cash transfer model, has helped improve childhood nutrition and education in Brazil, and the system has been successfully transplanted to Africa. India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee scheme entitles each rural Indian household by law to 100 days of unskilled work per year on public works programmes. China’s emphasis on infrastructure development in other developing countries has resulted in improvements in electricity supply, an increase in railway connections and reduced prices for telecommunications services. In our new Strategic Plan (2014-17), we are committing to support South-South and Triangular cooperation, complementing the traditional North-South model, across the board, to be a critical part of the post 2015 development agenda.This vision cannot rest on any routine, isolated or short-term approaches. Scaling-up strategy will be the key to ensure our support delivers lasting impact. In this regard, we see ourselves as: • knowledge brokers, to help identify, share and adapt scalable Southern solutions that are tested, cost-effective, sustainable; • capacity builders, to support developing countries toRead More

      • Social and political transformation can only be achieved with young people’s participation | Heraldo Muñoz

        17 Oct 2013

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        A group of young UN volunteers in Peru. (Photo: Win Bouden/UNDP Peru)

        Latin America and the Caribbean has around 156 million people between the ages of 15 to 29, which means that 26 percent of its population is young. However, only 1.63 percent of deputies and senators in 25 parliaments in the region are 30 years old or younger, according to a recent UN Development Programme (UNDP) assessment. More worrying still is the fact that women still lag behind: among the few young parliamentarians just 32 percent are women. Having so many young people is an opportunity for any region. But in the case of Latin America, this demographic advantage coexists with unequal opportunities for its youth, which is reflected in low voter turnout among young people and a political representation crisis that feeds the recent social mobilizations. This confirms the need to boost efforts to meet young Latin Americans' demands and needs, and to recognize their capabilities and roles in promoting democratic change. In this context, more than 22 young parliamentarians from 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean signed a pact to expand political participation of the youth of the region during a recent meeting in Brasilia, organized by UNDP, Brazil’s National Youth Secretary and the Ibero-American Youth Organization, withRead More

      • Protecting people with disabilities in times of disaster | Jo Scheuer

        12 Oct 2013

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        Approximately 10 percent of the world's population lives with a disability. Often ignored, forgotten or stigmatized, people with disabilities not only struggle for daily recognition, but face life-threatening challenges in times of disaster. Those whose mobility is impaired cannot access evacuation routes; those with visual or hearing impairment don’t receive early warnings; and those dependant on health and other community infrastructure suffer disproportionately from disaster. During the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, the death rate amongst people with disabilities was twice that of the general population, and when Hurricane Katrina hit the US in 2006, the immobile poor were disproportionately left behind in New Orleans. Fourteen percent of those who remained were living with a disability that made them physically unable to evacuate, while 23 percent were caring for a disabled person. October 13 is the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction. The theme this year is ‘disability and disasters,’ a welcome move to draw awareness to the difficulties those with disabilities face in times of disaster. 157 countries have now signed the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities pledging, among other things, to protect persons with disabilities during conflict, humanitarian emergencies and disasters. In planning and preparing for disasters, however,Read More