Our Perspective

      • Women are still being forcibly or coercively sterilized, it's time to end the practice

        08 Sep 2014

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        A MOM AND HER NEWBORN BABY AT THE MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR THE MEDICALLY NEEDY IN DHAKA, BANGLADESH. PHOTO: KIBAE PARK/UN

        Though voluntary sterilization is considered an important form of pregnancy prevention in many parts of the world, force or coercion should never be part of the equation. However, there continue to be cases of women, people living with HIV, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities, or transgender and intersex persons who are sterilized without their full, free and informed consent. Our report, “Protecting the right of key HIV-affected women and girls in healthcare settings” highlights the persistence of this practice amongst women and girls living with HIV, along with a range of other serious forms of abuse.  These practices are not only discriminatory, they are also violations of fundamental human rights. As reported in 2012 by the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, coercive and discriminatory practices in health care settings are rife, including forced HIV testing, breaches of confidentiality and the denial of health care services, as well as forced sterilizations and abortions. Voluntary sterilization is dependent upon a legal environment and social and health programmes, policies and practices that guarantee the rights of all individuals to free, full and informed consent. To this end, countries must prohibit the practice of forced abortion and coerced sterilization of women andRead More

      • One number that tells a much bigger story in the Pacific

        02 Sep 2014

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        WITH SUPPORT FROM UNDP AND FUNDING FROM THE GEF, THE GOVERNMENT OF SAMOA HAS STEPPED UP TO INTEGRATE CLIMATE RISKS INTO THE AGRICULTURE AND HEALTH SECTORS AND INTO FORESTRY MANAGEMENT. PHOTO UNDP/SAMOA

        Small islands face big challenges. This week’s Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) Conference in Samoa probes some of the most pressing ones. How do we protect our ocean resources for future generations? How do we prepare for the destructive forces of climate change on fragile islands? How can countries find the human and financial resources to sustain productive businesses, homes, schools and health services? How can countries stem rising youth unemployment? The list is as long as the oceans are wide. There is one important, often overlooked development indicator that lurks behind these larger issues and is a pre-condition for development progress in all countries. This worrisome indicator which is under discussion this week is mentioned in a new United Nations report, The State of Human Development in the Pacific: a Report on Vulnerability and Exclusion in a Time of Rapid Change. The report is being launched days ahead of the SIDS Conference in Samoa. What is it? Life expectancy. It provides a simple measure of the overall health status of a population. And the picture in the Pacific is not good. An average person in New Zealand or Australia can expect to live about 10 years longer than a person in Vanuatu andRead More

      • Financing Post-2015: A quick run-down of the expert committee’s report

        13 Aug 2014

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        DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEM INTRODUCED IN THE FARMLANDS OF AKMOLA REGION IN KAZAKHSTAN. PHOTO: UNDP IN KAZAKHSTAN

        The UN’s inter-governmental committee of experts on sustainable development financing met for the last time this month to put the final touches to their much anticipated report on how the world should finance the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals – or SDGs. I’ve had the opportunity to attend many of the committee’s sessions, and they’ve had a mammoth task. So what have they come up with? You can read the full report here, but below is a quick heads-up. The range of issues they’ve had to cover is massive: from assessing how much cash is needed to finance sustainable development to thinking about where the cash could come from and where these funds should be directed. The report draws up a ‘menu of options’ for the financing of sustainable development. This allows policymakers in different countries to make choices as to what policies and financial instruments are most suited to them. That makes perfect sense of course; the strategy that will be best for a climate-vulnerable small island state such as the Maldives won’t necessarily be the same for a larger resource-rich country such as Kazakhstan. On the other hand, it could also lead governments to ‘cherry-pick’ among the ideas presented, and to leave theRead More