Our Perspective

      • Do-it-yourself Sustainable Development: The SDGs go DIY

        25 Sep 2014

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        WOMEN PARTICIPATE IN MANAGEMENT TRAINING, PART OF A UNDP PROGRAMME THAT AIMS TO ENHANCE THE GOVERNMENT’S EFFECTIVENESS IN FULFILLING THEIR MANDATE. PHOTO: UNDP BANGLADESH

        With the proposal for Sustainable Development Goals now available for all members of the General Assembly to consider further, the question on many of our minds is:  where to next?  Once global sustainable development goals are adopted next year, how can we best help governments, citizens, and the private sector take them from aspiration to reality? So far almost 5 million people in almost 100 countries have either voted on their priorities for a new development agenda through the MY World survey or engaged in face-to-face discussions on what is needed to improve their future. As part of our broader work supporting innovation for development (I4D), we are looking for new ways of inspiring action on these priorities. So far, some interesting approaches have emerged: Micro-narratives and qualitative research to learn more about complex issues    The World we Want consultations asked what people need for their future, engaging people who are not usually part of policy debates. For example, people living with disabilities in Belarus and youth at risk in Kyrgyzstan shared their experience through micro-narratives. This data was then used to advocate for policies better suited to meet their needs. In El Salvador the consultations provided data used to advocate for a multi-sector citizen security strategy.  Platforms for encouraging civicRead More

      • Cambodia turns climate change crisis into opportunity

        22 Sep 2014

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        MS. KHEL KHEM, A MEMBER OF THE OLDER PEOPLE ASSOCIATION BAK AMREK VILLAGE OF BATTAMBANG, SHOWS HOW SHE ADAPTED HER HOME GARDEN TO FLOODS. PHOTO: UNDP CAMBODIA

        Cambodia is ranked among the top 10 countries most vulnerable to climate change. This is not only due to climate risks, but also to lack of capacity to adapt and respond.  Eighty percent of the population lives in rural areas with limited knowledge, infrastructure and opportunities; and more than 70 percent rely on agriculture that is heavily sensitive to climate change, putting the country’s economic and social development at risk. Cambodia’s efforts to fight climate change began in 1995 when the country ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and later acceded to the Kyoto Protocol in 2002. In 2006, the Cambodia national adaptation programme of action to climate change (NAPA) was developed. In late 2013, the country launched its first-ever comprehensive Climate Change Strategic Plan, recognizing climate change as a challenge to development requiring urgent and joint attention. This is the highest political commitment in combating climate change in Cambodia. Now the crucial question is “What’s next?” – How will the strategic plan be effectively implemented in order to achieve its vision and strategic goals? We, at UNDP, have been providing technical and financial support to the Government to develop climate change policies and plans. One of our most successful programme isRead More

      • Women are still being forcibly or coercively sterilized, it's time to end the practice

        08 Sep 2014

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        A MOM AND HER NEWBORN BABY AT THE MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR THE MEDICALLY NEEDY IN DHAKA, BANGLADESH. PHOTO: KIBAE PARK/UN

        Though voluntary sterilization is considered an important form of pregnancy prevention in many parts of the world, force or coercion should never be part of the equation. However, there continue to be cases of women, people living with HIV, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities, or transgender and intersex persons who are sterilized without their full, free and informed consent. Our report, “Protecting the right of key HIV-affected women and girls in healthcare settings” highlights the persistence of this practice amongst women and girls living with HIV, along with a range of other serious forms of abuse.  These practices are not only discriminatory, they are also violations of fundamental human rights. As reported in 2012 by the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, coercive and discriminatory practices in health care settings are rife, including forced HIV testing, breaches of confidentiality and the denial of health care services, as well as forced sterilizations and abortions. Voluntary sterilization is dependent upon a legal environment and social and health programmes, policies and practices that guarantee the rights of all individuals to free, full and informed consent. To this end, countries must prohibit the practice of forced abortion and coerced sterilization of women andRead More