Our Perspective

      • Women’s empowerment and corruption prevention can go hand-in-hand

        18 Apr 2014

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        A WOMAN IN INDIA WITH A STATE-ALLOTTED BICYCLE THAT HAD BEEN DENIED HER WITHOUT EXPLANATION. UNDP HELPED MEMBERS OF HER COMMUNITY LEARN ABOUT THEIR LEGAL RIGHTS, EMPOWERING THEM TO SECURE THEIR ENTITLEMENTS, LIKE BICYCLES. (PHOTO: SHUBHANGI SINGH/UNDP INDIA)

        By Magdy Martínez-Solimán A recent discussion at the 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women initiated by UNDP and partners highlighted what an asset grass-roots women’s organisations can be in the fight against corruption in their communities. The discussion was based on country stories about how women-led strategies strengthened transparency and accountability, leading to prevention of corruption. By way of background, UNDP funds and supports a programme in partnership with the Huairou Commission (a global network of grassroots women’s organisations) that so far has mobilized 2,300 community members and trained more than 500 people on social accountability strategies in Brazil, Nepal, Nicaragua, the Philippines and Uganda. Not only did women lead anti-corruption initiatives, their involvement also reaped important gender equality gains. For example, in less than a year, the programme yielded results that speak for themselves: in the town of Jinja in Uganda, because of women’s collective fight for land rights, 35 women received land deeds in their names, and 120 women are in the process of obtaining these deeds. In Brazil, since the start of the programme, 3,000 land deeds were granted to women as rightful owners. Corruption is not gender-neutral. For example, in many developing countries, women are oftenRead More

      • In search of win-win ways to address climate change

        16 Apr 2014

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        BANGLADESH HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED BY THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE AS ONE OF THE COUNTRIES MOST VULNERABLE TO RISING SEA LEVELS. (PHOTO: UNDP IN BANGLADESH)

        By Jacques Van Engel Compelling scientific evidence indicates that reducing short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) might slow down global warming by up to 0.5⁰C between 2010 and 2050. These SLCPs are agents with a relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere that warm the climate, like black carbon, methane and Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). A report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) shows that by reducing the presence of these pollutants we could prevent more than 2 million premature deaths  worldwide each year, and an annual crop loss of more than 30 million tons after 2030. But if nothing is done, the impacts of climate change could translate intodevastating consequences for sustainable development. The world is relentlessly trying to find solutions that reconcile economic growth and development with the need to control the increase of greenhouse gases. So is the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). By addressing short-lived climate pollutants we are implementing a model with positive impact on climate change, while improving the environment, economies and people’s health. And we are not alone. UNDP is a partner to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (CCAC) and focuses on reducing the negative impact of HFCs on climate and energy use. ThisRead More

      • The road to real progress against poverty and inequality | Antonio Vigilante

        30 Mar 2014

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        FISH FARMERS IN RURAL CAMBODIA ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE THANKS TO A PROJECT FUNDED BY THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION. (PHOTO: ALEJANDRO BOZA/UNDP CAMBODIA)

        This year marks the 10th anniversary of UNDP’s partnership with the European Union. This relationship was forged based on the reality that the only way to make real progress in the fight against poverty and inequality is through coordinated multilateralism – and it has.   In the last decade, the EU has provided 3.3 billion Euros to UNDP activities in 115 countries, bringing about tangible results: - In Pakistan, the UNDP-EU partnership supported about 5.5 million people to rehabilitate 4,000 villages after the 2005 earthquake and the 2010 floods. Temporary employment benefitted 1.3 million people, 40 percent of which were women. - Elections in 53 countries have been supported by the partnership - 28 countries have been helped to better prepare for natural disasters. - Within the framework of the Poverty Environment Initiative, which supports 24 countries across several regions, the partnership has helped countries incorporate poverty-environment linkages into national development planning. - In the area of climate change, the partnership supports 25 countries to carry out nationally driven climate-change mitigation actions. One of the key factors that make the partnership effective is that the cooperation takes place at multiple levels: policy, advocacy, knowledge-sharing and programmes, each feeding and complementing one another. This helps the partnership bring about change at the level of international policyRead More